Tag Archives: realise dreams

Knitting With Glass – Impossible!?

Making the “impossible” possible is creation and creativity at its finest. Creation starts with an idea or vision – but it takes determination, endurance and resilience to bring it into being, to realise what formerly existed only in our mind.

I’ve been a textile crafts addict for thirty-plus years, and although the technicalities of the textile world fortunately :) still bear lots of surprises and challenges for me, it takes a lot to stun my mind into time-out.

Which is exactly what happened a few weeks ago when I came across artwork which I would not have believed possible:  “Knitted Glass” by Carol Milne.

Cakewalk 7" x 11" x 11" by Carol Milne - Kiln-Cast lead crystal knitted glass

Cakewalk 7" x 11" x 11"

What intrigued me just as much as “How can this be possible?” was the context in which Carol sees her Knitted Glass (see Carol’s statement below). I contacted her immediately to ask whether I might feature her work on my blog, and as you see she said yes :)

Knit Wit by Carol Milne - Self-portrait in knitted glass and knitted copper. 19" x 10" x 12"

Knit Wit - Self-portrait in knitted glass and knitted copper. 19" x 10" x 12"

Here’s Carol’s brief statement about her work:

I see my knitted work as metaphor for social structure. Individual strands are weak and brittle on their own, but deceptively strong when bound together. You can crack or break single threads without the whole structure falling apart. And even when the structure is broken, pieces remain bound together. The connections are what brings strength and integrity to the whole and what keeps it intact.

Darn by Carol Milne - A fraying, knitted glove with a pun for a title. 10" x 18" x 13"

Darn - A fraying, knitted glove with a pun for a title. 10" x 18" x 13"

I found it very difficult to choose only a few photos from Carol’s amazing site, so here three more.  The last one is E.D.’s favourite – I wonder why… ;)

Bustle by Carol Milne - Kiln-Cast lead crystal knitted glass

Bustle 7" x 16" x 16"

Quadrille by Carol Milne - Kiln-Cast lead crystal knitted glass

Quadrille 5" x 11" x 11"

Eddy by Carol Milne - Kiln-Cast lead crystal knitted glass

Eddy 5" x 11" x 11"

Thank you, Carol :)

An inspiring “real world” example for “knitting with glass” – or knitting society by making the “impossible” possible:  Blood-lines of action – Butterfly Effects for Change by creatingreciprocity

Image sources: all photos courtesy Carol Milne www.carolmilne.com

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Related articles:

Featured: “Save Somali Children from Hunger” – an eleven-year-old boy wants to raise $13 million

The East Africa Drought

drought

"drought" - not only a natural phenomenon, but also a state of deprivation of Heart and Mind

Compassion, choice, determination and action know no age restrictions. Andrew Adansi-Bonnah, 11, wants to raise $13 million for his cause. Read how a Ghana schoolboy launches solo famine fundraiser (Associated Press via yahoo.com), and the related article on modernghana.com.

UNHCR spokesperson Melissa Fleming: “We estimate that a quarter of Somalia’s 7.5 million population is now either internally displaced or living outside the country as refugees. The drought is compounded by prevailing violence in southern and central parts of the country.”

Source of the quote and more on the Horn of Africa famine and how you can help: http://www.unhcr.org/4e16da4d9.html

How do you choose to act?

Maria

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Featured: Tayla Kelley and David Barth

The best life we can live is one that maximizes every skill, every talent, every breath we have and gives it back to the world without reservation… Live it. Elizabeth Obih-Frank

Tayla Kelley, 13, has Primary Immune Deficiency Disease. Her chance to still be alive at age 18 is sixty percent. She has decided not to let the stress of medical treatments and hospitalisation pull her down. What she wants to do with her life is dance; and now she’s “Dancing With The Stars”:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z3k7w6anqww

David Barth, born in Rotterdam/The Netherlands in 1998, is diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome, a form of autism. His special perception, skill and patience find expression in his paintings and comics which show an amazing sense of detail. One of his drawings, “Birds”, features 397 different species; when you follow the link to David’s portfolio, “Birds” is the third thumbnail from the left.

book "Drawing Autism"

cover of "Drawing Autism" - image source: Mark Batty Publisher

Since his first exhibition in 2005 David has won several awards. In 2009, “Birds” was David’s contribution to “Drawing Autism”. For more information on this book please visit the publisher: Mark Batty Publisher.

Enjoy and let yourself be inspired :-)

Maria

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Have-Your-Say-Day (2)

The content of this post will be as interesting as your comments make it ;-)

  • Questions?
  • Answers?
  • Suggestions?
  • Tips?
  • Dreams?
  • Wishes?
  • Events?
  • Actions?
  • Reactions?

Anything goes, but maybe you prefer a prompt? How about the…

…Topic of the week: Vision

sailing at sunset

a captain needs a destination

Ithaka 

When you set out for Ithaka
ask that your way be long,
full of adventure, full of instruction.
The Laistrygonians and the Cyclops,
angry Poseidon – do not fear them:
such as these you will never find
as long as your thought is lofty, as long as a rare
emotion touch your spirit and your body.
The Laistrygonians and the Cyclops,
angry Poseidon – you will not meet them
unless you carry them in your soul,
unless your soul raise them up before you.

Ask that your way be long.
At many a Summer dawn to enter
with what gratitude, what joy -
ports seen for the first time;
to stop at Phoenician trading centres,
and to buy good merchandise,
mother of pearl and coral, amber and ebony,
and sensuous perfumes of every kind,
sensuous perfumes as lavishly as you can;
to visit many Egyptian cities,
to gather stores of knowledge from the learned.

Have Ithaka always in your mind.
Your arrival there is what you are destined for.
But don’t in the least hurry the journey.
Better it last for years,
so that when you reach the island you are old,
rich with all you have gained on the way,
not expecting Ithaka to give you wealth.
Ithaka gave you a splendid journey.
Without her you would not have set out.
She hasn’t anything else to give you.

And if you find her poor, Ithaka hasn’t deceived you.
So wise you have become, of such experience,
that already you’ll have understood what these Ithakas mean.

Constantine P. Cavafis

Image Source: US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration via gimp-savvy.com

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Flying Beyond Your Limitations

Striving for improvement of ourselves and our environment appears to be a constant struggle against restrictions, rules, and other limitations: at home, at school, at work, within the community or country we belong to, “the rest of the world”, and, not to forget, against our own flaws, beliefs, and habits.

Because of this struggle – or rather, our desire to control – we tend to perceive “limitation” as something negative which stands between what we want and what confronts us every moment. Potential and limitations however are nothing but the two extreme aspects of “What Is”. It’s up to us to choose, actively and consciously, which side of this coin we want to look at.

Accessing potential

There’s one problem though: How much of our potential is “visible” to us? Continue reading

Featured: WriteGirl

Creativity nurtures potential. One example, with amazing results, is the nonprofit organization WriteGirl, based in Los Angeles. Their creative writing and mentoring program for at-risk teenage girls opens doors where before there were brick walls and wire mesh.

In their own words:

“WriteGirl is a nonprofit organization for high school girls centered on the craft of creative writing and empowerment through self-expression. Through one-on-one mentoring and monthly workshops, girls are given techniques, insights and hot tips for great writing in all genres from professional women writers.”

“WriteGirl is most proud of the accomplishments of its teen members…100% of our graduating seniors have entered college, many on full or partial scholarships.”

WriteGirl anthologies have won a total of 33 book awards including: Best Book: USA Books News · Grand Prize Winner Next Generation Indie Book Awards · 1st Place, London Book Festival · 1st Place, National Indie Book Awards · IPPY Silver Medal · Forward Magazine Finalist · 1st Place, Los Angeles Book Festival, Non-Fiction · Winner. International Book Festival”

You can download the WriteGirl info-kit as pdf.

Do you want to find out why Colleen Wainwright wants to shave her head on her 50th birthday? Watch the video or read 50 for 50.

Enjoy :-)

Maria

Update: Did The Communicatrix Colleen Wainwright have her head shaved?

SHE DID! Convince yourself (click on the thumbnails near the bottom of your browser window).

And she raised $ 61,517!!!

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